Did the Video really Kill the Radio Star?

Written by: Nuraine Ebrahim

To answer the question: no, it did not. Video Killed the Radio Star by The Buggles tried to predict the future of music, but as we all know, radio is still one of the most contributing factors in music today. The collaboration of the song and film formed together in the post-cinema world. Post-cinema explores the relationship between cinema and the ‘new’ digital media that has developed over time. Technology has allowed radical developments from cinema, to television and to online platforms.

“Post-cinema is not just after cinema, and it is not in every respect “new,” at least not in the sense that new media is sometimes equated with digital media; instead, it is the collection of media” (Denson and Leyda, 2016, p.2)

This music video borrows a technique from movies. It is self-reflexive, as it makes the spectator think about the words of the song in combination with the visual stimuli. It shows a radio, a TV and various performance pieces from the band. The scenes suggest destruction (seen in the beginning where there is an explosion) as reflected in the title of the song. The music video or short film fits into the post-cinematic approach through its editing. The narrative does not adhere to a linear time, but the editor cuts to the rhythmic beat to amplify the narrative emotion.

Once upon a time, we had to wait until Mtv played a song to watch a music video, now life has been made simpler because we’re able to stream it on YouTube or on Twitter, where the uploads are immediate and unrestricted in terms of copyright. The term post-cinema does not suggest the end of an era of filmmaking or the commencement of something new, rather it is described as the continuation of the cinematic form onto digital media (Shaviro, 2016, p.130).

References:

Denson, S; Leyda, J. (2016). Perspectives on Post-cinema: An Introduction. In: Denson, S. and Leyda, J. Post Cinema Theorising 21st-Century Film. Falmer: Reframe Books. p.2.

Shaviro, S. (2016). Post-Cinematic Affect. In: Denson, S. and Leyda, J. Post Cinema Theorising 21st-Century Film. Falmer: Reframe Books. p.130.

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One thought on “Did the Video really Kill the Radio Star?

  1. This post makes some really good points about post-cinema, and is a good analysis of the limitations of Video Killed the Radio Star as a prediction of the future of music. The interesting question raised is what kinds of experience are made available by post-cinematic forms and their continuities and discontinuities with cinematic experience.

    Michael

    Like

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