Schedule of the Module

Please find below the schedule for the module including topics and readings

Module Schedule                                                                                                    

Week 1: Recent developments in Film and Television Practices and Theories

This week will update some of the key concepts examined in semester one in the wake of 21st Century digital technologies. This will include looking at what happens to ideas of medium specificity and the cinematic apparatus when film as a material technological support no longer exists; how film and television are both affected by media convergence and globalisation, and how psychoanalytic theories of the subject and desire have been supplanted by theories of affect. In particular it will introduce ideas of ‘post-cinema’ and ‘post-television’ in the online era of YouTube and Vimeo. All of these themes will be further developed throughout the module.

 

Excerpts from

Russian Ark (Sokurov, 2002), Jurassic Park (Spielberg, 1993), Blade Runner (Scott, 1982), Easy Riders, Raging Bulls (2003)  

 

Core Readings

Lev Manovich (2016), “What is Digital Cinema”, Post-Cinema: Theorizing 21st-Century Film, Denson and Leyda eds., Reframe books, 20-50.

David Rodowick (2006) “The Virtual Life of Film” in: The Virtual Life of Film, Harvard University Press, 2-26.

Sean Cubitt (2005), “Neobaroque Film”, in: The Cinema Effect, Cambridge, Mass/London: MIT Press, 217-244.

 

Further Reading

Lev Manovich (2001), The Language of New Media, Cambridge: MIT Press.

Peter Biskind (1999), Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-drugs-and Rock ‘n’ Roll Generation Changed Hollywood, London/New York: Bloomsbury.

 

Week 2: Globalisation and Screen Studies: Production, Distribution, Consumption

This week we will look at different concepts of globalisation and how they have impacted contemporary screen cultures. Beginning from ideas of cultural imperialism versus ideas of global hybridisation, we will look at how global traffic in screen culture is both unequal and also decentering, depending on whether one focuses on production, distribution or audience consumption. Given the increase in the traffic of audiovisual material made possible by the Internet, we will examine how this has effected global flows of moving images and sounds.

We will also introduce the best platforms to use for your blog which you will need to start keeping from this week, for the first piece of assessment

 

Excerpts from:

Caché (Haneke, 2005), Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Lee, 2000), Babel (Iñárritu,2006), Sense 8 (The Wachowskis, 2015-), Orphan Black (Fawcett and Manson, 2013-2017),

 

Core Readings

Charles Acland (2003), “Global Audiences and the Current Cinema” in: Screen Traffic: Movies, Multiplexes and Global Culture, Durham: Duke University Press, 3-22.

Shanti Kumar (2003), “Is there Anything Called Global Television Studies?”, in: Kumar and Parks eds., Planet TV: A Global Television Reader, New York: NYU Press, 135-154.

Francesco Cassetti (2015) “Expansion”, in: The Lumière Galaxy: 7 Key Words for the Cinema to Come, New York: Columbia University Press, 99-128.

 

Further Reading

Kumar and Parks eds., Planet TV: A Global Television Reader, New York: NYU Press

Seung-Hoon Jeong (2013), Cinematic Interfaces: Film Theory after New Media, New York: Routledge.

 

 

Week 3: Media Convergence and Transmedia Storytelling

This week will follow on form questions of globalisation to look at what happens when formerly distinct media become combined via digital platforms. Not only are relations between ‘old’ media like film, television and radio increasingly fluid but they are also delivered via digital social media platforms that do not adhere to stable distinctions between media and also have introduced new forms based on the affordances of digital media platforms themselves such as spreadability and modulation. Convergence is a key term that has been used to account for this new situation in which audiovisual media are produced, distributed and consumed, but it is also a contested term. We will therefore look at some other frameworks for grasping the relations between old and new media such as remediation and transmedia narrative, leading onto the discussion of media archaeology in the following week.

 

Excerpts from

The Matrix (The Wachowskis, 1999), The Dark Knight Rises (Nolan, 2012), Sin City (Rodriguez/Miller, 2005) Star Trek (Roddenberry, 1966-1969), The Prisoner (McGoohan, 1967)

 

Readings

Henry Jenkins (2008). “ ‘Worship at the Altar of Convergence’: A New Paradigm for Understanding Media Change”, in: Convergence Culture: Where Old Media and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press, 1-24.

Francesco Cassetti (2015), “Relocation” in: The Lumière Galaxy: Seven Key Words for the Cinema to Come, New York: Columbia University Press, 17-42.

Jay Bolter and Richard Grusin (2000), “Introduction: The Double Logic of Remediation”, “Immediacy, Hypermediacy, and Remediation”, in: Remediation: Understanding New Media. Cambridge, Mass; London: MIT, 2-49.

 

Further Reading

Henry Jenkins (2008) “Searching for the Origami Unicorn: The Matrix  and Transmedia Storytelling in: Convergence Culture: Where Old Media and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press, 93-130.

Sue Short (2011), Cult Telefantasy Series: A Critical Analysis of The Prisoner, Twin Peaks, The X-Files, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Lost, Heroes, Doctor Who and Star Trek, Jefferson, NC: MacFarland.

 

Week 4: From Medium Histories to Media Archaeologies

This week will look at how revisions of early film history have contributed to the emergent paradigm of media archaeology, troubling medium specific histories of film and other media. Beginning form new approaches to early cinema, rejecting it as a primitive version of narrative cinema, this revisionism has led to questions of what materiality constitutes a medium, the relations between the apparatus’s of related media like cinema and television, and also the importance of minor media histories and practices outside of narratives of linear progress and development. While this extends well beyond audiovisual media and is often applied to aspects of digital culture like software, media archaeology is not only useful for rethinking audiovisual media in the digital era but also can be seen in audiovisual media themselves, such as Godard’s Histoire(s) du Cinéma project and Johan Grimonprez’s Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y, as well as film and video essays more generally.

 

Excerpts from

Histories du Cinéma (Godard, 1989/1998), Sunless (Marker, 1982), Dial History (Grimonprez, 1997)

 

Readings

Thomas Elsaesser (2006), “Early Film History and Multi-Media: An Archaeology of Possible Futures?”. In: Wendy Chun and Thomas Keenan eds., New Media, Old Media: A History and Theory Reader, New York: Routledge, 13-26

Jussi Parikka (2012), “Introduction: Cartographies of the Old and the New”, in What is Media Archaeology? Cambridge: Polity, 1-18

Thomas Gunning, “The Cinema of Attractions”

 

Further Reading

Jussi Parikka (2012), “Media Archaeology of the Senses: Audiovisual, Affective, Alogrithmic”, 19-40

Michael Goddard (2015), “Breaking Open the Black Boxes: Media Archaeology, Anarchaeology and Material Media”, New Media and Society 17 (11): 1761-1776.

 

Week 5: Post Cinemas 1: Digital Cinema

 

This will be the first of two weeks looking at the idea of post-cinema, by focusing on several instances of digital cinema and different ways of theorising it. Beginning with ideas of “post-cinematic affect” we will look at how cinema in the digital era is an impure phenomenon, affected by other media forms from television to music videos to YouTube aesthetics. We will explore what concept might be needed to understand digital cinema’s at times accelerated and other times slowed down impure digital aesthetics.

Excerpts from

Southland Tales (2006), ExistenZ (1999), A Scanner Darkly (2006), Inland Empire (2006).

 

Core Reading

Steven Shaviro (2016), “Post-Cinematic Affect” In: Shane Denson & Julia Leyda (eds), Post-Cinema: Theorizing 21st-Century Film, Falmer: REFRAME Books,129-144

Haiping Yan “Amidst Landscapes of Mobility: The Corporeal Turn in Contemporary Chinese Cinema, in: Jerslev and Nagib eds, Impure Cinema: Intermedial and Intercultural Approaches to Film, London: I.B. Tauris, 203-224.

Ann Jerslev (2014), “David Lynch Between Analogue and Digital: Lost Highway, The Straight Story and The Interview Project” In: Jerslev and Nagib eds, Impure Cinema: Intermedial and Intercultural Approaches to Film, London: I.B. Tauris, 282-299.

 

Further Reading

Leon Gurevitch (2016), “Cinema Designed: Visual Effects Software and the Emergence of the Engineered Spectacle”, in  Shane Denson & Julia Leyda (eds), Post-Cinema: Theorizing 21st-Century Film, Falmer: REFRAME Books, 270-296.

Holly Willis. New Digital Cinema: Reinventing the Moving Image. Wallflower Press, 2005

 

 

Week 6: Post Cinemas 2: Music Videos, YouTube and Unruly Media

This will continue the exploration of post-cinema but this time outside of the framework of cinema completely, looking at such unruly audiovisual forms as the music video and YouTube videos. It will pose the question of what becomes of the cinematic apparatus when it is not only digital but produced and consumed in forms bearing little realtion to the classical cinematic apparatus.

Excerpts from

A range of music videos, including by Chris Cunningham and Spike Jonze, as well as Beyoncé Lemonade (2016). Also TV series Mr Robot, and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

 

Readings

Carol Vernallis (2013), “YouTube Aesthetics”, in: Unruly Media, New York: Oxford University Press, 127-154.

Carol Vernallis (2013), “Music Video’s Second Aesthetic” in: Unruly Media, New York: Oxford University Press, 207-233.

Caetlin Benson-Alliot (2013), “Going Gaga for Glitch: Digital Failure and Feminist Spectacle in Twenty First Century Music Video”m In: Vernallis, Carol, Amy Herzog, and John Richardson. The Oxford Handbook of Sound and Image in Digital Media. OUP USA, 127-139.

 

Further Reading

Lynn Joyrich, “Tubular Vision: The Ins and Outs of Television Studies”, in Chun, Fisher and Keenan eds., New Media, Old Media, 2nd edition, New York: Routledge, 649-664.

 

 

Week 7: Audiovisual Assemblages, Archives and Ecologies

This session will focus on how what was formerly cinema is now entangled in a range of audiovisual practices, including video and installation art, as well as the more commercial spreadable media already examined. This will involve and examination of the relations between cinema and the museum in the digital era, as well as the aesthetics of some examples of especially cinematic installation art. It will pose the question of what is a media assemblage and relate this to ideas of media ecologies and multi-media archives.

 

Excerpts from

Wind and Water (Ruiz, 1996), Matthew Barney: No Restraint (Chernick, 2007), The Passing (Viola, 2006), One Day Pina Asked (Akerman, 2013), Pina Bausch (Wenders, 2011), We Live in Public (Timoner, 2009), Lo and Behold! (Herzog, 2016).

 

Core Reading

Angela Dalle Vacche (2012), “Introduction: A Csomology of Contingency” in: Vacche ed. Film, Art, New Media: A Museum without Walls?, Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 1-22.

Casetti, Francesco (2105), “Assemblage” in: The Lumière Galaxy: Seven Key Words for the Cinema to Come, New York: Columbia University Press, 60-82.

Wolfgang Ernst (2006) “Dis/Continuities: Does the Archive become Metaphorical in Multi-Media Space”? In Wendy Chun and Thomas Keenan eds., New Media, Old Media, New York: Routledge, 105-124.

 

Further Reading

Matthew Fuller (2005), “Introduction: Media Ecologies”, in: Media Ecologies: Meteiralist Energies in Art and Technoculture, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1-12.

Richard Dienst (2006), “Breaking Down: Godard’s Histories” in Wendy Chun and Thomas Keenan eds., New Media, Old Media, New York: Routledge, 125-132.

 

Week 8: Realism 2.0: Discussions of Realism in a Digital Age (OK)

This week we will focus on our relation with reality in a digital age, tackling how we process what we see and how what we see is produced. Referring to pre-digital discussions on realism where necessary, this session aims to introduce key questions regarding “realistic” image as well as realist narrative. Examining various examples, we will discuss whether new technologies altered our relationship to reality fundamentally or it is essentially the same relation with a different outlook?

 

Excerpts form: Wall E (Andrew Stanton, 2008), Avatar (James Cameron, 2009), Birdman (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, 2015)

 

Core Reading

Michael Allen “The Impact of Digital Technologies on Film Aesthetics” in Film Theory and Criticism eds. Braudy and Cohen.

Stephen Prince. Digital Visual Effects in Cinema: The Seduction of Reality. New York: Rutgers University Press, 2012.

Anne Friedberg “The End of Cinema: Multimedia and Technological Change” in Film Theory and Criticism eds. Braudy and Cohen. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.

 

Further Reading

Ivone Margulies. Rites of Realism: Essays on Corporeal. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003.

  1. N. Rodowick. The Virtual Life of Film. Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. 2007
  2. Bryant and G. Pollock (eds). Digital and Other Virtualities. London: I. B. Tauris, 2010.

 

Week 9: Cinema and the Senses

This session will look at some of the more recent discussions on the relationship between spectator and the spectacle. How does the relation between screen and spectator work? What were the ways this relationship was discussed and what are some of the more contemporary discussions? Introduce some of the key terms and discussion of phenomenological film studies, the lecture will focus on the sense of sight –the primary sense associated with our experience in relation to images- and touch, a less directly related sense yet an important one relating to images.

 

Excerpts from

Ararat (Atom Egoyan, 2002); Measures of Distance (Mona Hatoum, 1988); Dumplings (Fruit Chan, 2004); The Piano (Jane Campion, 1993)

 

Core Reading

Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener. “Cinema as Window and Frame” in Film Theory: An Introduction Through the Senses. London: Routledge, 2015.

Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener. “Cinema as Skin: Body and Touch” in Film Theory: An Introduction Through the Senses. London: Routledge, 2015.

 

Further Reading

Vivian Sobchack, “What My Fingers Knew: The Cinesthetic Subject, or Vision in the Flesh” Senses of Cinema. Issue 5, April 2000. http://sensesofcinema.com/2000/conference-special-effects-special-affects/fingers/

Laura Marks. The Skin of the Film: Intercultural Cinema, Embodiment and the Senses. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000.

Anne Friedberg. The Virtual Window: From Alberti to Microsoft. Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2009.

Daniel Yacavone. Film Worlds: A Philosophical Aesthetics of Cinema. New York: Columbia University Press, 2015.

 

Week 10: Contemporary Artistic and Activist Screen Practices: Guest Lecturer Treasa O’Brien

Blogs are due this week on Monday the 28th of March by 6 PM. You should submit a word document of PDF with links to each of the five posts you are submitting for assessment. Please check these links are working as any post that cannot be accessed will receive a mark of zero

 

Week 11: Cities and Urban Screens

This session aims to discuss our relationship to cities and screens. In contemporary cities screens are everywhere, in addition to our personal devices various forms of screens surround us. Because neither our relationship to images nor to cities remains the same, we will use this session to build on the discussion on cities and their representations, and think about contemporary relationship between images, cities and screens.

 

Core Reading

Johan Anderson and Lawrence Webb. “Decentering the Cinematic City: Film and Media in the Digital Age” in Global Cinematic Cities: New Landscapes of Film and Media, eds. J. Anderson and L. Webb. London: Wallflower Press, 2016.

Chris Berry et all. “Introduction” in Public Space, Media Space. Eds C. Berry, J. Harbord, R. Moore. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

 

Further Reading

Chris Berry. “Screen Cultures and the ‘Generic City’: Public Screens in Cairo and Shanghai” Global Cinematic Cities: New Landscapes of Film and Media, eds. J. Anderson and L. Webb. London: Wallflower Press, 2016.

Ackbar Abbas. “Affective Spaces in Hong Kong/Chinese Cinema” in Cinema at the City’s Edge, eds. Y. Braester and J. Tweedie. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2010.

Thomas Elsaesser. “The City but Not Bounded by It” in Global Cinematic Cities: New Landscapes of Film and Media. eds. J. Anderson and L. Webb. London: Wallflower Press, 2016.

 

Week 12: Summary and Review: Screen Cultures in the 21st Century and essay tutorials

This session will present a summary of the content already covered in the module and also discuss the essays in detail. It will be followed by essay tutorials.

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Welcome to the Moving images, Multiple Screens blog!

This is the blog where you will be able to post every week about the module. You can access the blog using the user name and password.

You can write text, attach images as well as links.

For example this week we are discussing globalization and will be looking at the television series Sense8 as an example.

You can watch the trailer below.

Enjoy blogging and we will discuss this more in class.